Nutrient Management

Mr. Samstag has experience on twenty projects for planning and design of wastewater treatment plants for nutrient removal: from the 0.3 mgd Forks plant, which was the first in the State of Washington designed for nitrogen removal and effluent infiltration, to planning for conversion of the four largest treatment plants discharging to Puget Sound: the King County West Point and South Treatment Plants, the Tacoma Central Treatment Plant, and the Post Point treatment plant in Bellingham. He was part of the design team for the nitrogen removal upgrade of the LOTT WWTP in Olympia, the capital of Washington State. The LOTT WWTP remains the largest nitrogen removing WWTP in the State of Washington, designed for a very stringent summer discharge standard of less than 3.0 mg/L total inorganic nitrogen (TIN). He was part of the Water Environment Federation task force for preparation of the recent Nutrient Roadmap for which he wrote the concluding chapter. Randal’s experience is summarized in the table and project descriptions below.

Nutrient Experience

Nutrient Roadmap, Water Environment Federation – From the WEF abstract: “The Nutrient Roadmap, written to help utilities achieve the goal of a zero net impact with regard to nutrient discharges by 2040, is a first step toward accelerating the transition to smarter nutrient management, facilitating the shift from removal to recovery, and anticipating future requirements to conserve energy and reuse resources.”

Nitrogen Removal Study CoverNitrogen Removal Study, City of Tacoma – Process engineer and principal author of a report evaluating process alternatives for upgrade of the 30 mgd HPO Central Treatment Plant and the 7 mgd capacity North End Treatment Plant for nitrogen removal. The study was funded by the City of Tacoma and the Washington State Department of Ecology. The study evaluated a wide variety of potential nitrogen removal technologies eventually selecting post-secondary biological aerated and denitrifying filters for the CTP and post-secondary membrane bioreactors (MBR) for the NETP.

West Point Nitrogen Removal Study Cover PageWest Point Nitrogen Removal Study, King County, WA – Process engineer and principal author of a report evaluating process alternatives for upgrade of the 215 mgd West Point Treatment Plant for nitrogen removal. The study evaluated a wide variety of potential nitrogen removal technologies including modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) and Bardenpho suspended growth processes with membrane separation, integrated fixed film activated sludge (IFAS) processes and post-secondary biological aerated and denitrifying filters (BAF / DNF). Bardenpho MBR was selected as the representative alternative to represent potential impacts of conversion of Puget Sound’s largest WWTP to nitrogen removal.

Renton_aerial-216-55South Plant Nitrogen Removal Study, King County, WA – Process engineer and principal author of a report evaluating process alternatives for upgrade of the 144 mgd South Treatment Plant for nitrogen removal. The study evaluated a wide variety of potential nitrogen removal technologies including modified MLE and Bardenpho suspended growth processes with membrane separation, IFAS processes and post-secondary BAF / DNF. Parallel MLE or Bardenpho MBR processes were selected as the representative alternatives for, respectively, 8 mg/L and 3 mg/l total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) permit scenarios to represent potential impacts of conversion of this large WWTP to nitrogen removal.

LOTT_first_anoxicNitrogen Removal Facilities, LOTT Wastewater Treatment Plant, Olympia, WA – Performed process evaluation and design for new aeration and biological nitrogen removal (BNR) tanks for conversion of a 22 million gallon per day high purity oxygen (HPO) activated sludge facility. The LOTT project was Washington’s second plant designed for nitrogen removal with its most severe effluent standard of 3 mg/l total inorganic nitrogen. The design for LOTT used the four-stage Bardenpho™ process. Mr. Samstag led a team in field dye and solids testing of existing sedimentation tanks to establish their capacity under future design loads. Testing was also conducted at the Kelowna, British Columbia Bardenpho™ facility as a part of the work.

Secondary Treatment Expansion Design, Southport AWT, City of Indianapolis, IN – Process engineer and principal author of a technical memorandum evaluating for capacity for upgrade of nitrification facilities for the 122 mgd Southport Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant.

ulu_pan_dan_photoExtension of the Ulu Pandan Sewage Treatment Works, Republic of Singapore – Project and process engineer for preparation of the preliminary engineering report and process engineer for design of extension of the Ulu Pandan Sewage Treatment Works in Singapore. The upgraded plant was designed for an ultimate, average-flow capacity of 480,000 m3/day (127 mgd). A new 75,000 m3/day liquid treatment module includes a two-stage activated sludge process with both lamella and stacked secondary sedimentation tanks. The second stage of the plant extension was designed for future implementation of biological nitrogen removal. A new plant water system uses ultraviolet disinfection and automatic strainers. The plant was designed for complete odor capture and treatment and eventual use of the covered portions of the liquid treatment module as a public park. The project also included a new headworks, new egg-shaped digesters, and new thickening and dewatering facilities.

Project manager and process engineer for a Comprehensive Sewage Facilities Planning study for the City of Aberdeen, Washington. In this project Mr. Samstag led client contact, process evaluation, and report writing for a comprehensive sewage facilities plan. The project included SWMM modeling of the collection system calibrated to recent storm-induced peak flows to establish design future peak flows, capacity rating of pumping and treatment facilities and evaluation of upgrade alternatives including modifications for improved ammonia removal and disinfection, solids handling facilities, and peak flow management facilities.

Wastewater process engineer for the Carnation Wastewater Treatment Facility, King County, Washington, Department of Natural Resources. The project consists of facility planning, preliminary design, design, and construction management services for a new 0.5 mgd membrane bioreactor (MBR) wastewater treatment plant. The project was designed to meet future stringent requirements for phosphorus removal in the Snoqualmie River upstream of Snoqualmie Falls.

Capital Facilities Plan, City of Marysville, Washington – Project manager and process engineer for evaluation of options for upgrade and expansion of a 6-mgd capacity aerated / facultative lagoon system with effluent filtration. TMDL limits on discharge to the Snohomish River will require a high degree of removal of ammonia and CBOD. A series of alternatives including advanced treatment and continuation of the current discharge versus transfer of the effluent to a new outfall in Puget Sound were considered.

Wastewater Facilities Plan Update, Spokane Advanced Wastewater Treatment Facility, Spokane, Washington – On the Spokane project Mr. Samstag served as process consultant for evaluation of requirements for effluent toxicity control and nitrification for this 40 mgd facility. He directed settling column tests as a part of evaluation of operation of the plant in a contact / re-aeration mode. Evaluations were also conducted into the feasibility of nitrification to a high degree to meet changing regulatory requirements.

Wastewater Facilities Plan, City of Clovis, New Mexico – Process and project engineer for facilities planning for new 4.0 mgd aerated lagoon treatment facilities for a mixed municipal and meat packing waste with effluent and nutrient reuse by irrigation of corn and milo.

Nitrification Facilities Pre-design, City of Stockton, California – Project and process engineer for preliminary design of nitrification facilities for a 55-mgd capacity wastewater treatment plant. The project included influent pumps, interconnecting piping, and up-flow biological aerated filters (BAF) for removal of ammonia and future nitrogen removal.

Predesign, Wastewater Treatment Plant Design, City of College Place, Washington – Process engineer for preliminary design of new sequencing batch reactor facilities for upgrade of this existing plant. New facilities will have a capacity of 1.65 mgd. This project was designed to meet stringent effluent limits of BOD, TSS, and Ammonia-Nitrogen for discharge to the Walla Walla River.

OTSD SchematicAeration Control System, Olympus Terrace Sewer District, Mukilteo, Washington – Project manager and process engineer for design of a cyclic aeration control system for an existing 2.2-mgd oxidation ditch plant. The control algorithm developed for this project turns oxidation ditch aerators and a propeller mixer on and off based on measured values of dissolved oxygen (DO) and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) to accomplish nitrogen removal.

Wastewater Reclamation Facilities Design, City of Fontana, Fontana, California – Process specialist for preliminary design of anoxic / aerobic suspended growth biological nitrogen removal processes for this 8 mgd capacity plant. A two-stage modified Ludzack-Ettinger process was selected for biological nitrogen removal including anoxic tanks, aeration tanks with fine bubble disc aeration, and rectangular secondary sedimentation tanks of the R.H. Gould design. Ultimate plant capacity will be 32-mgd average annual flow. For this project, Mr. Samstag led a team in field-testing of a plant currently serving the Fontana drainage to establish design sludge settleability characteristics.

Forks WWTPWastewater Collection and Treatment System, City of Forks, Washington – Project leader and designer for the Forks wastewater treatment plant, the first in the State of Washington to be designed for biological nitrogen removal. The Forks plant uses cyclic, extended aeration to achieve 98 percent removal of organic materials and 80 percent nitrogen removal. Sludge is stabilized in an earthen extended aeration basin and beneficially re-used by land application to adjacent forestland. Wastewater effluent is discharged through rapid infiltration basins. This innovative 0.3 mgd capacity treatment plant won the Consulting Engineers Council honor award for design in 1988 and the national award from the Environmental Protection Agency as the best operating treatment plant in its class in the United States in 1989. It won the same award again in 1993.